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. president and use your mandate to bring this country together to stop us from becoming greece. >> yes. >> man up, barack obama. strong words. >> he has a chance to be an historic president. what makes us greece? it's not because the tax code is at 35% versus 39.6. what's going to make this country greece, like every other western nation, retiring at 10,000 a day in terms of baby boomer, three workerses for every retiree, in 20 years we'll have two. medicare and social security are about $30 trillion underfunded. if you did what tip o'neill and ronald reagan chose to do, reform entitlements, we become the most dominant place on the planet pretty quickly. so what i would plead with the president to do is use this mandate. redo revenue, which we should. but what keeps us from becoming the country we want to be and damns the future generations is entitlement and spending. when i was 21, my mom died, when i was 22 my dad died. if it wasn't for social security survivor benefits, my sister would have never gone to college. social security is going to fail. when i was 22 we needed the 300 and
that didn't have. greece does not have an exit. citigroup had a 90% chance earlier this year. the biggest day of this jurn year was june 17th when they elected a moderate who did not try to pull greece out. and germany stepped up and gave them some money and that september the 6th, that was the european central bank. so you had china, maria, the united states and greece. none of them went off the cliff. maria, this is for you. our little christmas present for you, maria. >> thank you. thank you. >> we want to remember, by the way, this is emblem attic of all these nice things you have said this week for the victims of the newtown connecticut tragedy. we love the way you all have been strong in support of them. >> thank you. i very much appreciate that. michael, let me ask you, what do you want to be avoiding in 2013? >> i think you have to look at it from the standpoint of extreme. it's clearly in the bond market. it's clearly in the love for dividends. it's clearly in the love for income versus capital appreciation, versus cycle kral. i call this the rocky balboa stock market. we've had
't like them to save the country from becoming greece but i'm not going to set aside the 1.2 trillion in cuts. any hope of going over the fiscal cliff must start in the senate. not one democrat would support the idea that we could protect 99% of americans from a tax increase. boehner's plan b i thought made as soon as. to my republican kcolleagues, te the ronald reagan model is if you get 80% of what you want, that's a good day. i lime simpson-bowles. the president is going to get tax rate hikes. to my republican colleagues, if we can protect 99% of the public from a tax hike that, is not a tax increase in my book. chuck, maybe you and me and some other people in the senate can find a way to find this on the short term but on the long term there's not going to be a deal any time soon. >> you think we're going to go over the cliff? >> i think we're going to fall out of the fiscal tree. the big chance at the big deal is at the debt ceiling. that's when we'll have leverage to turn the country around, prevent from becoming greece and save social security and medicare. to anybody listening
or any american congress borrow anymore money until with fix this country from becoming greece. that requires significant entitlement reform to save social from bankruptcy and medicare from bankruptcy. social security is going bankrupt in about 20, 25 years. medicare is going bankrupt in 15 or 20 years. the baby boomers are coming in at 10,000 a day. and we just can't scene this. martha: president last week said we'll not play that game. last time around they wouldn't let the debt ceiling go up, i tell you right now, something to this effect we will play that game. >> we will play that game, mr. president. that is not a game. the game you're play something small ball. you're talking about raising rates on top 2% that would run the government for 11 days. you got reelected. how about doing something big that is not liberal? how about doing something big that is bipartisan. every big idea he has is a liberal idea that drowns us in debt. how been maing up, mr. president and use your mandate to bring this country together to stop us from becoming greece? doing what boehner, tip o'n
.s. ambassador to nato, greece, and a number of other places. nick, great to see you. you are such an old hand, veteran diplomat, and were at least at the state department. i think you were serving in greece. the last time we had one of these major reports, which was on the 1998 bombings. this report has been done by two senior experienced people, tom pickering and admiral mike mullen, and my indications are that it is really going to be very tough on the state department. hillary clinton has to defend this and present it to congress. >> well, andrea, i don't have a preliminary indication of what the report was saying, but i think secretary clinton would drae grae to testify publicly, but there are obviously congress has an obligation i think they have chosen to highly objective non-political, non-partisan people in tom pickering, ambassador tom pickering, and admiral mike mullen, and we'll see what the report says, but clearly the administration does need to deal with these issues before we get to 2013 and the president's inauguration. >> and one of the questions that is being examined is all
, portugal, certainly greece. so you have those economic woes. the euro is not going to thrive and it may survive thanks to the ecb, but you're not going to get that economy to thrive, and the fiscal union ask those are very slow going and though they may be moving quickly by european standards and i've been given the magnitude of the problem going very slowly. >> how should people be thinking about this? the average american, and they've been hearing about it for so long and they're not sure it will affect their pocketbook. do you think they will? >> and there's this incredible chance that greece will leave and the dominos will begin to fall. i think that's unluikely to happen as long as the ecb is willing to support that currency, but will it thrive? will those economies boom? i don't think so, i think it will be another year of recession and you will find individual opportunities and the stock picker's market and far as it's a strong growth, they're not there yet. >> thanks so much for joining us. good to see you tonight. >> you heard piers morgan talk about it with larry last week. af
but upper income americans and the sad news is we have accomplished little, in terms of not becoming greece, that bill will not affect the debt situation and it will be a a political victory for the president and i hope we have courage of our convictions, when it comes to raise the debt ceiling to fight what we believe as republicans. hats off to the president, he won. >> chris: quick follow-up, before we turn to senator feinstein, you said you don't think your conservative colleagues in the senate will filibuster or set up a procedural roadblock, they'll vote to avoid going over the cliff. >> if mcconnell can't get 60% of us to vote for the deal it will be hard for boehner to get through the house and i will want to vote for it, though i don't like it them. country has a lot to the stake here. >> chris: senator feinstein, is senator graham right, will we get a deal. >> he's partially right. yesterday, 2.1 million americans lost extended unemployment insurance. and, from this point on, it is lose-lose. my big worry, is, a contraction of the economy. the loss of jobs, which could be well ove
the brink. greece got upgraded today. who would have thought it. that is what the market is looking at. saying okay. it is not going to be the worst kcase sharcenario, but you coul extend the middle class tax cuts and be done with it. it is in a recession. >> and i think the market would not like that very much. everybody is expecting that you get the middle class tax cuts done. >> and if you can get china and europe doing better. it is hard to be terribly bearish on the u.s. >> y are going to stay with our politico expert. this is a rally that has surprised experts. it hasn't been that easy to be optimistic. >> it is. i think you have to be cautious here. the probability that this could fall apart is very, very real. >> so, you have to be careful up at these levels as a trader. i have low exposure up here. i have protection. that is how you have to play this market. stay with us please. >> yesterday it looked like washington was inching towards a deal. but today, plan b could be signaling differences. we have karen b and sara fagan herself a former political director. i know what it m
greece, and we have a government that we're willing to pay the taxes for 65% of the cost of it. we need to change that. we need both, both-- we need to do both. >> o'donnell: i'm flawed brought thaglad you brought that up. we're not even there. we're just dealing with this little short-term patch that you can't even get an agreement on. what does that say about what's happened here in washington and a real lack of confidence among the american people that it the body you guys serve in is just broken? >> well, it is, and it needs to change. this conservative republican, this progressive carriage we both voted for it. we worked on this for three years. there is room for compromise and agreement. here's what we ran into the problem with. 40% of deficit reduction in the sim son-bowles came from additional revenue, 40%. when we said to speaker boehner you have to come up with revenue, he said i'll come up with a plan that protects those making less than $1 million. he couldn't silent republican caucus. the only way we deal with this cries and the deficit is on a bipartisan basis. this can't
this lawmakers do not reach a deal in time? are we on our way as some warn to becoming greece? doug mcelway is live ph washington. there are nice things about greece that you won't mind emulating, but your budget, their economy not one of them. >> the parthanon a nice thing to see when you go to athens. when ron paul was running he got huge applause when he said a government that continues to deval its currency destroys the middle class. >> they don't have the money, they run out of borrowing power, guess what they do. they start printing money. >> reporter: the federal reserve has printed more moon to deep interest rates low. most economists agree there is a big risk in there, the debt to gdp ratio is 102%. our debt is actually greater now than the amount of money the entire u.s. economy produces. even at historically low interest rates that interest on the debt will cost the u.s. $222 billion this year. 570billion by the year 20, 22 if the rates stay that low. if interest rates ricin slightly every sector of the economy will have a hard time paying its bills. >> servicing the debt is
rather than contraction. it's been since october of last year. also abroad greece announcing it will buy back bonds through a dutch auction. the set up whether allow athenss to assess the level of demand before setting a final bryce for the deal. part of the country's efforts to cut its about a along debt. and in germany, merkel is not ruling out the possibility of notifying greece some of its debt once athens finances are in better shape. angela merkel told a german tabloid that the question of the so-called haircut can be revisited. in the past, merkel's government had ruled out forgiving any debt. >> in corporate new, ubs is reportedly close to a settlement. the "new york times" says the swiss bank is expected to pay horn $450 million over claims that some of its employees submitted false libor rates. that's pretty huge story and we will take a look and ten to see what happens with this. also morgan stanley trader is under investigation by cme regulators over trades and treasury futures four years ago. at the time he was employed by goldman sachs. he's now head of global interest rate
of trying euro trend. >> that's fine. >> misery loves company. we can have it all forever, like greece. >> we're not greece. and that's the whole point. neither is britain which is pretending its greece, and look where it's getting them. britain's not growing at all. >> would you do some stimulus? >> i probably would, yeah. >> what kind? >> there's a ton of infrastructure that needs to be done in this country. >> then do it. and borrow money -- >> it's free. we can borrow money for free for 30 years in real terms. the market is not telling the u.s. to tighten fiscal policy. it's telling the u.s. to borrow some money. >> can you make sure we only do things -- we're not going to fill high speed rail lines between cities no one wants to travel to? >> if you spend a billion dollars i can't guarantee that every last cent of it is going to be spent properly. >> how moan solyndras will be in that balance? >> only two. >> you have to deal with the issues that krugman never deals with. i love the explanation we should spend spend spend. what happens when interest rates rise? two is you're talki
seem like an emerging market economy here. >> are we greece? >> our politics are becoming as dysfunctional as greece. i mean, we're not greece, but if you look at what businessmen say about why they're not investing in the u.s., they will often give dysfunctional politics in washington as the top answer. it's not even tax rates that people are concerned about. it's just getting a deal, getting people aligned. >> we're going to roll some tape, but i just wanted to ask you quickly, last week your sort of advice to republicans was don't cave, compromise. >> right. >> so this week, given what we've seen so far, we see these one-on-one negotiations taking place, what do you think the best strategy on the part of the republicans is? >> don't cave. compromise. you're not going to get 35%. you're just not going to. you're not going to. the economy will go up in flames. you're just not going to get 35%. the president needs to understand he's not going to get 39.6%. if i were sitting in the house and the president asked me to go four, five percentage points up on tax rates right now
the lines of what spain did or ireland or greece, cut back our social programs dramatically. we'll have to do what the rest of europe will do over time, which is accept a lower standard of living forever everybody which is why the longer-term plan is so vital, not the short-term craziness. because everybody knows he we can't keep providing americans with the current level of services unless we raise taxes in a big way on everyone and cut spending somehow. even the democrats are unwilling to consider that kind of tax cut. that's why long-term spending cuts are so important. they figure into the job creation of the next 25 to 30 years, and the ability of people to stay out of poverty longer term. in the meantime, you can't get the growth needed for government receipts to go higher even in the near term. put simply, if you got someone from honeywell or eaton or celgene in the rule, explain the impact. the imperative would be to get this fiscal cliff done before vacation. hey, listen, yes, no vacation without legislation. because the longer the delay the fewer reasons to start a business an
that italy and greece would be following in disaster. of course, they subsequently turned out to be the single best places to invest for fixed income in the world. not only did the sky not fall, but you had to do some serious buying to keep up with the others around the world. we have been buying an etf for my travel trust. was there a more uniform agreement than the idea that the euro had to die and the weaker countries were going into a fre depression? we know a ton of countries that could do very well in a low-growth environment. a year ago all the wise guys were telling us to avoid china because it was a house of cards. the course only grew more uniform with the chinese market falling to multiyear lows. but in the last few weeks, china's economy bottomed during the summer as they were focused way too much on beating inflation. now it's become the best performer in the world, and i don't think you've missed the move which is why my trust has been buying an etf that mimics china. finally there's apple. we've become addicted to apple. we are deeply focused on its decline whic
was supposed to vanish by this time with the secret sellers around the country. i thought greece was supposed to be kicked out of the union. instead, my advice, do what my charitable trust did today, buy european stocks. you know where else there's much more to come? yep, oh boy was this one a hated one coming into this year. yeah, you know what i'm talking about, china. how about that economy over there? after pausing because the government was busy whipping inflation, now, thank you, late gerald ford, now it's coming on strong. i think growth in china's accelera accelerating. the stock market might be the most undervalued in the world. the stock market entirely could be under valued. how many short sellers told you to do the opposite and sell that market? after the steam roller it's been of late, what exactly are the short sellers saying now? i don't know, i'm not hearing them clearly. i'm not listening. i'm not, no, i'm not hearing. europe and china both were supposed to slip into oblivion in 2012. that was the easiest story, everybody wrote it. turned out two fabulous places to invest. ho
. my grandfather came here from greece. he opened a restaurant, the american dream. >> but he taught himself english. he taught himself to read the newspaper, and he became a very successful businessman. as he would say, only in america. youngstown was prosperous, and downtown youngstown was really prosperous. it was wonderful to go to downtown youngstown and be all dressed up in gloves and hat and going in and out of the shops and having lunch downtown. it was exciting. >> but that prosperity didn't last. youngstown ohio was the manufacturing backbone of this country but starting the late 1 1970s, the steel mill started to close, kicking this proud town in the gut. entrepreneur magazine named it one of the top ten best cities to start a new business. that's something that would have been unthinkable just a decade ago. >> it's a wireless device to allow students in the classroom to communicate with teachers. highly skilled, highly qualified people from a lot of good universities and colleges in the area, we were able to pick the best and brightest of for good paying technology jobs.
this year were things that didn't happen. no greece exit, no china hard landing and no u.s. slipping into a recession. therefore, the market has been able to lift. >> the last thing that may not happen is the fiscal cliff resolution, too. that could throw an iron in the fire. we've all got to be mindful of the possible debt downgrade. moody's and fitch are still at aaa and they have been rumbling they might take us down, and i think if s&p goes down a notch, mandy, that's not good for the market. >> the fact that these predictions did not come true i guess show that making predictions -- >> it shows the value of strategists. >> okay. >> it shows the value of vat jists. >> what are you predicting for 2013? >> i think you have to watch things in europe. the big day is the september 11th elections in germany and germany could be harder after the election. in the first half is the sent ceiling discussion and finally profits, personal income and production, if those can do better than the markets can lift but right now the view is for a nothing market from here till year end. once the sea
't going pay its debts. we are going to be like greece. that was -- everybody -- both sides, by the way, republicans and democrats, both used the phrase default. you know perfectly well how it works in the government. you can make choices. >> i hate to break the news to you but -- i don't think anyone other than watching cnbc anyone actually cares and nobody believes the federal government will not pay social security or other debts. >> are you kidding me? i think they do. that's what they start with. right? start with the social security checks aren't going to go out. then -- what do people do, call their congressmen? the elderly get frightened. they think they won't have their weekly paychecks. >> this would not be the first time anyone from the executive branch tried to scare senior sit sense what do we do? we are going over the cliff. do you think we are going over cliff? >> i talked to the speaker's people today. bottom line is the speaker did remarkably smart. he didn't bring his bill up because he didn't have the votes and then sent every one of his members home so they could not
but will be a downward slide to make us like greece. no lodnger a viable economic power. >> hang on. we'll continue this. we have to take a quick break. the fiscal cliff has the president sounding like new york yankees legend yoeg gi ber ra. >> this is deja shz vu all over again. americans want to know why you can't get stuff down in an organized timetable. >> so if we all saw it coming, why did congress wait so long to do something about it? why do toys for tots and hasbro trust duracell to power their donated toys? duralock power preserve. it locks in power for up to 10 years in storage. guaranteed. duracell with duralock. trusted everywhere. anyone have occasional constipation, diarrhea, gas, bloating? yeah. one phillips' colon health probiotic cap each day helps defend against these digestive issues with three strains of good bacteria. approved! [ female announcer ] live the regular life. phillips'. >>> we are back. let me just go back to one point, and that is there are people sitting around wondering whether their taxes will go up. i want to ask you again about the chances of you think of somethin
broke. we'll go the way of greece, and the president hasn't moved off that. he's still playing politics with these issues, and frankly i think most of us now don't care who gets the blame. we're concerned about our economy and about our paychecks. >> richard, senate minority leader mitch mcconnell took to the senate floor this afternoon and said despite the setback all is not loss. >> there's no situation that remains an impossible sticking point. the sticking point appears to be a willingness and interest or frankly the courage to close the deal. i want everyone to know i'm willing to get this done. but i need a dance partner. >> you know, so richard, here we are talking about this blame game, and everybody is pointing their fingers at one another as we've been hearing all afternoon. what do you think that republicans are looking for here? >> i heard the same "meet the press" interview that terry did. i didn't hear the president casting blame. what i heard was the president talking the ways in which he's gone more than halfway to the republicans' position on taxes, on spending. i think
, the worse is finally past, there's some hideous headline out of greece that the comes back with a vengeance and the s&p gets bashed down by a torrent of selling. that's why it's so important to prepare yourself and your stocks for the next catastrophe around the corner. expected or unexpected so that you can make money in any market, or at least lose less and not just when things are going smoothly. you have to build this stuff into what i call your world view. you have to assume that somewhere sometime something will go wrong. i'm not saying you should be a super skeptic permabear, not at all. over the course of my 31-plus years in this business i've seen the averages climb way too way, watch the market make people way too much money to ever be too cynical and close-minded. being negative all the type has not historically been a lucrative strategy, and i don't see any reason why that should change. there are a handful of incredibly professional short sellers, hats off, able to turn pessimism into profits but i don't recommend trying to follow in their footsteps at home. i never recommend s
us from becoming greece. >> i want to bring in national political reporter for the ap and matt welch, editor and chief of "reason" magazine. good morning. >> good morning. >> so last night apparently team obama called boehner and asked for more details on taxes. boehner's office said they're waiting for more details on spenting cuts. liz, why does it matter who gives what details first? what's the game here? >> well, i think what you're saying is whoever gives the details first, the other side is going to have an advantage to either position against those details. you know, the white house during health care debate, for example, was very -- it was, you know, step back and didn't give many details as to what they wanted to do because at the beginning because they didn't want to target on their back. i think this is almost a game of chicken right now. the problem is it's a game of chicken with very, very high stakes. and you've got the white house out there, you know, publicly putting pressure on republicans by sending obama, for example, to michigan but gamt trying to negotiate behind
and to move them in the right direction so that we don't become greece? it's interesting that we talk about the previous panel talk about state government, and one of the big problems in europe is that there is no fiscal coordination among the independent countries, and somewhat to our state, and who has to come along and bail them out when they have not done what they are supposed to do. i don't know that we're all that much different so we have a great panel. people that are far smarter than i am, and i'm going to introduce them all, and ask questions, and i'll ask the pam to keep answers relatively short so we can get through a lot of questions, and still get out of here on time. first of all, we have ali son frasier, director of thomas a. rowe institute for economic studies at the heritage foundation. director -- as director, she oversees the heritage foundation research on a wide range of domestic, economic issues incoming federal spending, taxes, the debt, and the deficit. before joining heritage in 2003, she was deputy director of the oklahoma office of state finance where she worked
at the pace it has been growing. we do have an advantage that greece does not have. we print the world's money. we cannot expect the dollar will be keen to tomorrow. -- forever. if the europeans can manage their deficit and we cannot, the world will switch to euros. there is a tweet here -- guest: the cbo is supposed to be a political, but it cannot be too alarmist. if we go over the cliff, we are looking on january 1, some of this is already milton. about $600 million -- $650 billion in spending cuts and tax increases. that is about 4% of gdp. that is an enormous negative stimulus. a detraction from demand. that would surely be a deep recession. the cbo relies on simulation models that did not take into consideration investor sentiment, the reaction of consumers, and so forth that they wholly lose confidence in their government. if we go over the cliff and stay there, people will start to conclude that washington cannot manage its affairs. all bets are off on economic modeling. it is impossible to say what happened that other than it would be very negative. host: one piece that you actually d
. google is flying from south to north. so i think they're kind of mingling right now in greece. so in santorini. this is his dashboard. you can see where he is. there's a lot of games. kids having a ball with it. it shows you where santa is. he's leaving his presence as he moves. he's moving from africa north. so now they kind of just bypassed each other in greece. and now google is now in finland where the other guy is. or similar santa was earlier. they're kind of meeting in the middle. just around the equator. >> here's the thing, we just don't want a midair santa crash. that would be the worst case scenario. thank you so much, alexandria, in an age of e-mails and tweets, here we go. it's nice to know that a letter can still be a powerful tool. it also helps if you have a powerful role model. that would be 9-year-old gabriella miller. she got strangers from around the world to write letters to santa. that out pouring will bring some joy for severely ill children like gabriella herself. now, our affiliate has the story. >> we have a mountain of letters here. >> reporter: chris' c
of the gunman had just returned, short trip along to a luxury resort in new hampshire. france and greece the years she felt comfortable about leaving her son adam at home unsupervised. >> democrats say that the gop plan will not make it past the senate. beyond that the president has already said he will veto it if it gets to his desk. the back- and-forth continues in congress and hopefully by january 3rd they will get the deal done. we will be back in just a moment. >> the tool yet to yield the camera of america's most popular car fare poorly in a new front crash test by at the insurance institute for highway safety. in the test the camera is a front wheel ended at bending the passenger compartment foot well in word. the steering was pushed off so far the air bags did not deploy. the toyota pre as the hybrid wagon didn't perform any better. it also earned a poor rating. honda's accord sedan and this is to keep his eye she receives the institute's stock rating of good and the crash test. general motors is recalling nearly 119,000 pickup trucks in the u.s. because of that can fly open unex
to the internet, we met a few. 16-year-old cristos lives in greece and has taken more than five different computer courses. >> i now know what i want to study at university and what i want to do in my life. >> reporter: 22-year-old from kazakhstan got a job with twitter after taking artificial intelligence. >> you can gain all the top knowledge from a top university. >> reporter: in northern virginia, 14-year-old sophia and her mother, laura, have completed a variety of classes. >> you can sit on your couch in your pjs and learn about any topic that interests you. >> reporter: do you have a sense of what grade you would give yourself? >> probably an a minus. i'm a little rusty. i don't know about you. >> i would give myself an a plus. >> reporter: back at the university of pennsylvania, poetry professor says opening his class has changed his whole feeling about teaching. >> i like it because i get to teach people all over the world. they're self selective. because they're not getting credit at the moment and it's free, they come because they're interested in my topic, which is modern poetry. >> re
's who -- >> and pay everybody more money. >> they can buy stuff and go back on vacation in greece and all that stuff. >> do we count -- i'm getting -- there's nothing like this to get the twitterers going wild. 1-1-1 is -- 1-1-2001 -- >> 2001? >> yeah. >> yeah? >> 2101. >> yeah? >> less than -- >> you got a zero in there. >> less than 100 years. >> but it's 1-1-1 -- >> but 01 you'd write it probably. >> you would want to get to ten 10-10-10. 10-10-2110. i had someone call me dummy and say -- >> you? >> yeah. said it's 988 years. then he called me a dummy. i tweeted back to the guy, i'm the dummy? i'm the dummy? 988 years? i'm the dummy? the fed is meeting today -- i admit it, i resemble that remark. you're with me, pal. the fed is meeting to discuss whether operation twist will expire at the end of the month. and jerry webman is here. >> i showed up. >> chief economist. >> and union member. >> a unionyist. >> honorary union member. so is leaseman actually. maybe you can -- >> the president -- >> maybe -- you probably with -- >> workers fly i guess. we are strong, solid, more than
. this morning, they agreed finally on the disbursement of aid to greece. some says it removed uncertainty. other investors, not so sure. i wanted to show you the italian curve, italy and spanl wrapping up their fund-raising for the year. their auctions weren't all of that huge, but we are seeing yields fall, prices rise across the board as investors did show up. if we flip over to spain in particular, we can take a look at the three-year over here. a bid to cover ratio of 4.8%. one indication certainly of the kind of indications there are where the ecb is expected to be the most active if and when these countries have to access their bailout programs. now we're seeing prices in spain sell off a little bit. the ten-year, just under 5.4% is the level there. for the longer dated papers, investors are a little bit more wary. now, that news coming out of the euro group meeting, i wanted to show you the euro/dollar as we wrap up today's global market support. it's still down .1%, 1.3056. that would tell you that the resolution is largely priced in. now as focus moves into the start of next year, a cou
legislator of athens in ancient greece. and he replaced the prevailing system at the time of oral, law and blood feud by a written code of rules that could only be enforced by a court. the first court system. so the rules, because they were written, were hard to get around so they were draconian rules, which is where draconian -- draco. >> wasn't he in harry potter, too? >> he was also in harry potter. i don't know.was he? >> i think he was the bad kid growing up. >> and, anyway, with that out of the way and the world hurdling to an end tomorrow, still to come, if you want to know whether or not you should be optimistic about a fiscal cliff deal -- >> oh, draco malfoy. >> oh, yeah, the young bad kid? >> the blond kid. >> he was so good he was bad. check out the markets on any given day and we're going to do just that. tell what's happening with the fiscal cliff. [ penélope ] i found the best cafe in the world. nespresso. where i never have to compromise on anything. ♪ where just one touch creates the perfect coffee. where every cappuccino and latte is only made with fresh milk. and
, it is more important to make all the fiscal cuts them back as greece and spain know, when people do not trust your debt, weak issue too much debt. if everyone heads to the door like china and other is, our debt is really going to go up. host: should the raising of the debt ceiling be tied to these overall conversations or is that too dangerous? you talk about people shied away from your debt. caller: yes. you are going to have a tipping point that people are blind to. since 1847 with popular delusions and the madness of crowds when you get a contagion in there, you do not know what is going to be. people are going to run for the door. it is just stupid. they should have done the tax cuts first and then see if they need to raise taxes. the more sound policy is to cut some savings first to even see if we have to raise taxes. host: here is the statement put out by the white house yesterday. it actually promises to lower rates for the wealthy and sticks the middle class with the bell. bill. susan in pennsylvania, a democratic caller. welcome to the conversation. caller: what i am thinking is the
and especially greece. the other thing we could do is come to a midline course of action where you could actually -- what can you minimally due to cut spending? what can you minimally due to have shared sacrifice so everyone is sacrificing something in this game? the other thing we don't talk about -- the interest rates on the deficit have been the lowest in 200 years. if we went back to what it was 50 years ago, it would triple. ishave not got to thin leaderst not about being popular or well- liked. he may lose his leadership role. in the end, he would have saved this country from fiscal disaster, from bankruptcy, and a crisis that will affect all americans them that all americans. . all americans. host: what would you like to see done? is this a united opinion on the right when it comes to how it should be handled? guest: let's take the impact of the tax policies. that is a very good question. if you are a worker making $60,000 a year, head of household, and if your income bracket is $60,000 a year, currently he will pay $7,800 -- you will pay $7,800 in taxes which means your net income will be
. president, and use your mandate to bring this country together to stop us from becoming greece. >> okay. there we go. some advice there for the president. >>> here with us now former white house counselor for president bush. ceo of the consulting firm, hill and milton strategies. dan bartlett back at the table. good to have you this morning. a couple must reads to look at. >> you can ask a question if i can ask rattner a question. you go first. >> when are you going to man up? what happened, man? we republicans, we used to drive liberals crazy. we'd win elections we shouldn't win. we would steal senate seats we should never steal. we would shock -- they never saw it coming. willie geist talked about the morning after the 2004 election, you had liberals on the upper west sidewalking around like zombies. some of them walked straight into the hudson river. that doesn't happen. we're not the smart party, we're the stupid party. what happened? >> well, there's that. >> what happened in '12? how did we perform so badly? is it our tactics? >> well, the primary process obviously didn't help us
to improve. if you look at countries as lindsey graham said, look at greece and countries like that, you don't want america to be plunged into that almost insolvable crisis. they were sensible and very funny together. a lot of very quiet exchanges with me about the constitution about gay rights and gun control and obviously i come from a country where almost everything is federal in the terms of you have a law for a country. i said in gay marriage, are you going to have a situation with guns where almost every state has different regulations. is it not time in america, perhaps truly was united on these big issues which in the end are about fairness and equality as with gay rights. they weren't having any of that. it gets lively. >> the full interview tonight at 9:00 p.m. eastern. "piers morgan tonight." please come back and visit. >> this is why you get the bond movies and i end up with denzel castoffs. >> some days you may be in a james bond movie too. >> the worst moment of my career was taking my wife to see the bond movie and see your head rear up as the star of the film. >> some day. >>
greece. at some point the american people are going to say, enough. every american family has to balance their budget. every american family has to make tough decisions. why don't we make some tough decisions, if we want to have things paid for like weather capabilities, like amtrak, like replace federal assets, buying vehicles when we have 660,000 vehicles in the inventory. why don't we start making tough decisions. i often mention that the approval rating that we have of the american people is rather interestingly low. the last one i saw was i 11% approval. no wonder -- no wonder. we're about -- in a matter of literally hours -- to spend about $60 billion of the american taxpayers' money, estimates of some is that it should be around $24 billion. without hearings, without the kinds of scrutiny that it deserves and the normal appropriations process. and i understand why we need some of this money in emergency fashion. but it's like the train leaving the station. it's loaded up with pork, and it's moving and so everybody wants to get on board. it's not the way that the congress should do
greece faced multi-year recession and slowdown, unemployment at over 25%, youth unemployment over 50%. what we saw was the recession expanding. spain, italy, the uk, all found austerity taking its toll even more as unemployment continued to rise in some of those countries. even the large country, the economic powerhouse germany found its slelf slowing down. the root cause of it all was the inability of the european governments to come to policies to get growth started again. towards the middle and end of the year they did, but the tale was style there. very much austerity again and again. perhaps if there was only one change that took place as we moved into the fall and into the winter. it was the realization that most of these countries could take no more austerity. social welfare having been cut, health care cut, unemployment, growth virtually nonexistent. now the talk is not of more austerity, but how to get growth started again across the contine continent. suzanne. >> thank you, richard. >>> christmas, of course, is a time of giving, but there are many struggling families in bos
becoming greece. i will not set aside the 1.2 trillion in cuts. >> reporter: talking about $1.2 trillion in spending cuts. the president's scaled back plan i mentioned dealing with unemployment benefits, dealing with taxes, leaves the issue of domestic spending cuts basically after the holidays. that is why some republicans like graham are skeptical. gregg: is it fair to say democrats are adamant there will not be a deal without taxes going up? >> yeah. when you talk to white house officials they say, they're sort of mystified that speaker boehner is still arguing about the level on tax rates going up because the president ran on this back in the campaign. he won the election, and, since the day after the election he has been saying this is what's going to happen to get a deal. that you have to have rates go up. that is basically what senator chuck schumer said yesterday. take a listen. >> on taxes, i know it is hard for the republicans but the president ran on that platform, 250, no tax increases people below but taxes for people above. he won. 60% of the voters were for it in exit poll
the nearby town of greece, new york, drove by. the gunfire hit his car. he was apparently injured by the shrapnel. now, as for the shooter, authorities say that he apparently was killed by a gunshot, there was some type after a shootout. police arrived, their fired at the shooter. not clear to what extent, if any, he fired back at the police officers, but we do know that he is now dead. not clear if it was self-inflicted. the police chief for webster new york, gerald pickering, held a news conference a few hours ago x he described what amounted to nothing less than an ambush. listen. >> at this time, you know, it's still under investigation, but we, you know, we have different leads that we're chasing down. it does appear that it was a trap that was set for responding, you know, first responders. but causative reasons we don't have at time. >> reporter: the police chief said that the shooter's body was found nearby. he also said that it was not clear at this time what type of a weapon it was, whether it was an assault rifle. also to be mentioned because of the shooting that took p
a year. greece has a debt problem. we have a significant debt problem. martha: indeed. stuart, thank you. >> sure. bill: $16 trillion. now to newtown, connecticut, attempted normalcy and so much heartache. schools in the area opening first time since friday's massacre except of course sandy hook elementary which remains closed indefinitely as police continue their investigation there. there are questions whether it will be ever reopen. volunteers in the neighboring town of monroe, seven miles away, hard at work, getting a former middle school ready for sandy hook students. all of this as the grim task of bearing so many young innocents gets underway. 10:00 in the morning funeral services begin for james mattioli. followed by services for jessica reek coast. -- rekos. a rabbi spoke about that service. >> being celebrated as a pure innocent child by the promise of life ahead of him. who brought joy to his family and to his community and who will be sorely missed. as his older brother said he could have been anything if he had grown up. this is tragedy that we have no answers for this. bill
it do? >> that, that what would happen is, we were turn into europe. we all see it. we see greece, and spain and italy, and france. they all grow slow of the they have extremely high unemployment rates. we would have a slow economy and high unemployment forever if we taxed ourselves like that. gregg: all right. >> this idea that somehow you can't tax the middle class or we won't, it's impossible. if we keep --. gregg: that is a bad idea, right, i get it. i get it. vat. that i get. >> value-added tax is the worst thing. gregg: brian, what is the solution? >> yeah. i, well, if i were king for a day and told to make the economy grow faster, i would cut the size of our federal government. we need to cut spending everywhere because, the best our economy has done in the last 30 years is during the '80s and '90s. that's when ronald reagan and bill clinton cut spending. i would take the clinton tax rates, right now, i would take them. gregg: really. >> they won't hurt the economy, if, i got clinton's spending. he spent one-third less on federal government than barack obama is today, one-t
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